Posts Tagged ‘Eagle Pack natural pet food’

10 Things You Didn’t Know About the Iditarod

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

The chilly run known as the “Iditarod” stretches more than 1000 miles between Anchorage and Nome, Alaska. Known as “mushers,” Iditarod competitors are seasoned athletes that from all over the world.

Here are 10 things you probably don’t know about the Iditarod:

1. The Iditarod is just over 40 years old. The race started in 1973 to save dog sled culture.

2. The name comes from the Native American Athabaskan tribe. It means “a distant place.”

3. Mushers guide their sled dogs with spoken commands rather than with the reins.

4. The dogs are required to wear dog boots to protect their paws from the ice and snow.

5. Each team has 12-16 dogs. There’s a “lead dog” who the other dogs follow.

6. The race takes approximately two weeks to complete.

7. Sled dogs need and love to run. Without several hours of running daily, these dogs become restless and self-destructive.

8. Mushers are required to take at least two eight-hour breaks and one 24-hour break during the race. During these breaks, the sled dogs are examined by veterinarians.

9. Each musher has GPS, you can track them on the web at http://iditarod.com/gps/

10. Mushers have their own lingo, for example, “Dog in a basket” means one of the dogs is resting on the sled rather than running.

The traditional race kickoff is March 1. While the familiar blue-eyed husky is one of the primary breeds who run, malamutes and several other Alaskan breeds make up the dog sledding teams too.

Hundreds of volunteers staff the Iditarod trail at the various checkpoints. They help with first aid, restocking the sleds and caring for the tired humans and dogs.

Eagle Pack is proud to provide food for many sled dog teams including Aliy Zirkle’s team, Alan Moore’s team and Martin Buser’s team.

To learn more about Aliy Zirkle and Alan Moore (husband and wife), check out their blog: http://spkenneldoglog.blogspot.com/p/aliy-zirkle.html.

You can learn more about Martin Buser on his blog: http://buserdog.com/

Winter Tips

Thursday, December 12th, 2013
Now that the coats and gloves are out of their summer hibernation you may need to give some extra thought to your pets in cold weather. Animals with diabetes and other health issues can be particularly susceptible to the change in weather.
1—Coats– While a St. Bernard will be thrilled with the drop in temperature, your
Pointer may be shivering. Shorthaired dogs simply don’t have the same advantage. You can keep your pet warm with a coat, blanket or vest. A waterproof one will keep them warm and dry on those wet, dreary days. Shorthaired dogs will also be happiest with shorter walks when it’s really cold outside.
2—Give ‘em shelter – While many dogs will be prefer to be inside during the winter, the cold weather breeds (and some cats) will want to enjoy the snow more than you. If your pets will be outside for extended periods, provide them with a dog house or a crate on the porch. Add a blanket or towel for comfort and warmth. Of course, check on them often and don’t leave them outside in freezing weather when you’ll be away for hours. Pets can develop frostbite and hypothermia if they get too cold.
3—Protect them from ice/snow melters – The chemicals used to melt snow and ice in driveways and on sidewalks are good for preventing slips, but they can be harmful to your pets. Be sure to rinse or wipe your pet’s paws after a walk. Otherwise, they’ll lick the chemicals off, causing  inflammation and upset tummies.
One way to clean them when you come in from a walk is to use a rimmed cookie sheet by the door. Fill it with warm water and have them step in it, or place their paws in one at a time. This will loosen any ice crystals that may have gotten lodged in their paws and warm their feet up. Wipe them with a towel afterwards.
4—Lock up Antifreeze – Antifreeze tastes sweet to dogs and cats but it can be deadly. Keep antifreeze locked up and far out of the reach of curious pets.
5—Play inside – When the “wintry mix” is into its 3rd day, or your pet isn’t one who enjoys the cold, warm up inside. A rollicking game of “hide and seek” will warm you both up. Just make sure you take a few minutes to move delicate furniture or breakables out of the way.

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Now that the coats and gloves are out of their summer hibernation you may need to give some extra thought to your pets in cold weather. Animals with diabetes and other health issues can be particularly susceptible to the change in weather.

1) Coats– While a St. Bernard will be thrilled with the drop in temperature, your

Pointer may be shivering. Shorthaired dogs simply don’t have the same advantage. You can keep your pet warm with a coat, blanket or vest. A waterproof one will keep them warm and dry on those wet, dreary days. Shorthaired dogs will also be happiest with shorter walks when it’s really cold outside.

2) Give ‘em shelter – While many dogs will be prefer to be inside during the winter, the cold weather breeds (and some cats) will want to enjoy the snow more than you. If your pets will be outside for extended periods, provide them with a dog house or a crate on the porch. Add a blanket or towel for comfort and warmth. Of course, check on them often and don’t leave them outside in freezing weather when you’ll be away for hours. Pets can develop frostbite and hypothermia if they get too cold.

3) Protect them from ice/snow melters – The chemicals used to melt snow and ice in driveways and on sidewalks are good for preventing slips, but they can be harmful to your pets. Be sure to rinse or wipe your pet’s paws after a walk. Otherwise, they’ll lick the chemicals off, causing  inflammation and upset tummies.

One way to clean them when you come in from a walk is to use a rimmed cookie sheet by the door. Fill it with warm water and have them step in it, or place their paws in one at a time. This will loosen any ice crystals that may have gotten lodged in their paws and warm their feet up. Wipe them with a towel afterwards.

4) Lock up Antifreeze – Antifreeze tastes sweet to dogs and cats but it can be deadly. Keep antifreeze locked up and far out of the reach of curious pets.

5) Play inside – When the “wintry mix” is into its 3rd day, or your pet isn’t one who enjoys the cold, warm up inside. A rollicking game of “hide and seek” will warm you both up. Just make sure you take a few minutes to move delicate furniture or breakables out of the way.

5 Summer Safety Tips for Dogs

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

With the arrival of June, summertime fun is in the air. Whether you’re headed to the beach or a backyard BBQ, be sure to take extra precaution with your pets to keep them safe. Pack a water bowl, some snacks, a towel and have fun!

Safety Tips for Dogs:

  • Stay hydrated — If you’re going to be outside with your pet this summer, make sure Fido has plenty of clean, cool water. Dogs can get overheated if they’re playing or running hard and they need to drink plenty of water.
  • Keep food and drink out of reach – Nothing puts an end to a picnic faster than realizing Max ate all the hamburgers and hot dogs. Plus, the ensuing stomach upset will not be pretty.
  • Lock down – holiday celebrations bring fireworks and dogs don’t like them. The booms and explosions hurt their ears and frighten them. Make sure you have a crate for your pet, or keep them on a short leash or better yet, get them home before the fireworks begin.
  • Dog bug repellant – if your dog attracts mosquitos, ease the itch with a bug repellant such as pennyroyal or citronella rubbed into a bandanna and tied around your pet’s neck. Pests don’t like these scents and are likely to seek dinner elsewhere.
  • No alcohol – Alcohol can be fatal to dogs so don’t let them get into the beer or other alcohol.

With a little planning, you can have a fantastic summer with your pet and keep everyone safe.   Share your plans on our Facebook Page.

Grooming Your Pet

Friday, August 3rd, 2012

EP Cat GroomingGrooming is a necessity regardless of your pet’s coat length. If you start grooming your dog or cat at an early age, it can be a pleasant experience for everyone involved, but it is never too late for good grooming habits.

Many dog grooming salons offer a basic puppy package designed to get your puppy accustomed to the experience, as well as a variety of grooming options for adult dogs. If you choose to groom your dog at home, only use shampoos and conditioners formulated specifically for dogs. During weekly grooming, check the ears for wax and yeast, trim the toe nails and brush the teeth. Running your hands over your dog’s body can be a bonding experience while you check for sores, ticks and other skin issues.

Most cats are clean creatures by nature, and will take care of most of their own grooming needs. However, excessive licking can cause hairballs, which may be regurgitated and cause discomfort to your kitty and messes in your home. Brushing your cat weekly can help to reduce the amount of hair ingested, while also giving you quality time together. Try cleaning his or her ears at the same time!

Your cat’s nail & dental health can be naturally maintained at playtime. A scratching post will help satisfy your cat’s natural instinct to scratch while keeping the claws trimmed at the same time. Chew toys filled with catnip are not only playthings, but also natural toothbrushes that gently scrape tarter from your cat’s teeth and gums.

Your favorite Eagle Pack dry dog and dry cat food also offers skin & coat support from omega fatty acids like flaxseed and Menhaden fish oil.

Share your pet grooming tips with us at www.facebook.com/eaglepackpetfood.