6 Fun Fall Activities to Enjoy with Your Pet

October 8th, 2015

September 23rd is officially the first day of fall! What’s not to love about this time of year? The weather is nice, the colorful leaves are falling and the holidays are right around the corner! You’re not the only one looking forward to this time of year – this can be a fun time of year for your pets as well. Let’s talk about some fun activities to enjoy with your pets during the fall months.

Take a Hike

The fall is the perfect time to explore some of your favorite hikes, trails, and national parks, so leash up your buddy and get ready for some fun! You and your dog are bound to enjoy the pretty fall foliage and all the great fall scents. Just make sure that your dog is properly treated for ticks and fleas before heading out, and you are on your way to a fun, safe hike!

Have a Doggy Play Date

Depending on where you live, fall can be a bit too chilly at times to enjoy the outdoors. Your dog still needs to get the proper amount of exercise and physical activity on those chilly days. Why not invite a friend to bring their dog over for a little play date action? This can be a lot of fun for both you and your dog and will provide them with a good amount of exercise!

Toss around the Football

We can’t speak for everyone, but for some people fall means FOOTBALL! So, get in the spirit and toss a football around with your dog in the park or the backyard. Sure, he can’t throw it back or score a touchdown, but he surely will love being on the receiving end. For smaller dogs you can even throw a small, plush football around instead.

Head to the Pumpkin Patch

Fall means pumpkin everything, right? Head to a pumpkin patch in your area and bring your dog along with you {as long as it is dog-friendly}. Let your dog help you pick out the perfect pumpkins to adorn your house with. This would also be a good time to snap some cute fall photos of your dog posing beside the prettiest pumpkin of the patch! Did you know that many dogs actually enjoy the taste of pumpkin? It’s even safe for them to eat! Give them a scoop with their next meal and see how they like it.

Camping Trip

A camping trip is like a dog’s dream come true, and fall is one of the best times of year to do it. Find a dog-friendly camping ground near you and plan a trip. Your dog will love spending quality time with you in the outdoors and you can enjoy unplugging and getting away for the weekend.

Halloween Fun

There are always plenty of pet-friendly community events happening around Halloween. These events are a great opportunity for your dog to get some social interaction and even for you to meet other dog lovers in your community. Start planning early and {if your dog doesn’t mind} find the perfect Halloween costume for both you and your dog to wear to join in on all of the fun!

Fall is such a great time of year to plan fun activities with your pet. We couldn’t possibly list all of the pet-friendly activities for you to enjoy. The important thing is to get out and spend some quality time with your pet and let them enjoy this time of year as much as the rest of us do. Happy Fall!

Decoding Dog’s Body Language

September 14th, 2015

Believe it or not, there is a science behind your dog’s body language and behavior. Body language is a form of communication for a dog, whether it be communicating with their owner or communicating with other dogs or animals. It is important for pet owners to be able to read their dog’s body language and understand their behavior and what they are trying to communicate. Your dog’s behavior is directly related to their emotional state. Let’s talk about some common dog behaviors and body languages and what they could mean.

Overly Excited or Hyperactive Behavior

How happy is your dog to see you when you get home? People often misinterpret their dog’s hyperactive behavior when they come home to simply meaning that they are happy to see them. Don’t worry, we aren’t saying that your dog isn’t happy to see you, but overly excited or hyperactive behavior is also a sign of a lack of exercise and pent up energy. So, what is your dog trying to tell you?

  • “I’m not getting enough exercise and it’s causing me to feel out of control!”
  • “Hey! I am way overdue on my daily exercise – let’s go for a long walk or jog!”

Destructive Behavior

If your normally house-trained and well-behaved dog starts to eliminate on the floor or chew on furniture, this could mean that your dog is not getting enough mental stimulation. In other words, they are bored. This may seem like a petty reason for a dog to behave this way, but think about it in these terms – it’s basically the same thing as a person with cabin fever. Dogs need interaction and mental stimulation just like we do. So, what is your dog trying to tell you?

  • “Hey – don’t you have a toy that I can play with or a bone that I can chew on?”
  • “Stop ignoring me! I could really use some quality time with you and I don’t know how else to get your attention.”
  • “I’m bored. Can we go for a quick trip to the dog park?”

Lethargy or Sudden Loss of Interest in Physical Activity

If your dog is normally very active and alert and then suddenly starts to display signs of lethargy or a loss of interest in normal daily activities, this is a sign that something is wrong. Sudden changes of behavior of any kind are a good sign that you need to take your dog to the vet. You know your dog better than anyone, so it’s important to pay close attention to normal behaviors and recognize when something isn’t right. So, what is your dog trying to tell you?

  • “I really want to go outside and play, but I just don’t feel very good. I don’t understand why I don’t have any energy.”
  • “Something isn’t right. I think I need to go see my veterinarian so that he can find out what’s wrong and get me back to my old self again.”

Body Language 101

Here are some common signs to look for in determining your dog’s mood. What is your dog trying to tell you? Let’s find out.

“I’m feeling happy and playful!”

  • Wiggly body
  • Relaxed wagging tail
  • Open, relaxed mouth
  • Bouncy, exaggerated gestures
  • Pawing at the air
  • Ears up and relaxed

“I’m feeling anxious or stressed out.”

  • Whining or whimpering
  • Hiding behind people or objects
  • Fast wagging, low tail
  • Ears may be pinned back

“I’m feeling scared.”

  • Tail tucked between legs
  • Head down, cowering
  • Tense and/or shivering
  • Ears pinned back tightly
  • May urinate submissively

“I’m feeling aggressive!”

  • Hair standing up on back
  • Lips curled back showing teeth
  • Snarling or growling
  • Intense eye contact on a particular subject
  • Leaning forward or ‘attack stance’

These are all behaviors and body language signals that dog owners should be aware of and pay close attention to. After all, this is the only way that your dog can communicate with you! Learning your dog’s normal behaviors and body language signals can help you keep them safe and healthy for many years to come.

Overly Excited or Hyperactive Behavior
How happy is your dog to see you when you get home? People often misinterpret their dog’s hyperactive behavior when they come home to simply meaning that they are happy to see them. Don’t worry, we aren’t saying that your dog isn’t happy to see you, but overly excited or hyperactive behavior is also a sign of a lack of exercise and pent up energy. So, what is your dog trying to tell you?
“I’m not getting enough exercise and it’s causing me to feel out of control!”
“Hey! I am way overdue on my daily exercise – let’s go for a long walk or jog!

Celebrate National Dog Day on August 26th!

August 6th, 2015
11 years ago, pet spokesperson Colleen Paige started National Dog Day to promote adoptable animals.
Every year, thousands of wonderful animals end up dropped off at pet shelters. In many cases, life circumstances change for their families who can no longer care for their pets. Sadly many of them never find their forever homes.
When you celebrate events like National Dog Day, it’s an opportunity to encourage adopting a pet. The more we talk about it and showcase some of these loveable pups, the sooner some of them will find a good home. From active puppies to laid back seniors, the shelters are full of great dogs looking for a family to love them.

11 years ago, pet spokesperson Colleen Paige started National Dog Day to promote adoptable animals. Every year, thousands of wonderful animals end up dropped off at pet shelters. In many cases, life circumstances change for their families who can no longer care for their pets.

When you celebrate events like National Dog Day, it’s an opportunity to encourage adopting a pet. The more we talk about it and showcase some of these loveable pups, the sooner some of them will find a good home. From active puppies to laid back seniors, the shelters are full of great dogs looking for a family to love them.

How to Encourage Adoption:

  • Social Media: If you know of a local pet adoption event, why not share it on Facebook? The more people who know about it – and see the adorable pictures of the pets– the more people will think about sharing their homes with one of them. Likewise, why not see if you can play matchmaker? Lots of shelters use social media to post adoptable pets of the week or month. If you share on occasion, you may help someone find the love of their life.
  • Clean: Clean out your closets and take old linens to the shelter. They can line the pet’s cages so the dogs have something soft to lie on.
  • Donate: Hold a “pawty” and get your friends and co-workers to donate food and pet toys to a local shelter.
  • Volunteer: Pet shelters always need volunteers to walk dogs, clean cages and do other tasks.
  • Gather:  Gather some friendly pooches and hold a dog party. You could collect donations there too.

Of course, you can also use National Dog Day as an excuse to lavish your own dog with attention or help out a neighbor. Such as spoiling your pet at a doggie spa day or taking your pooch to a pet resort for a fun day with other pets.

For those who say, “My favorite breed is rescue,” National Dog Day is a great opportunity to help your friends and family members rescue their next best friend.

Beat the Heat: Keeping Your Pet Comfortable and Safe in the Summer

July 22nd, 2015

Summer is upon us, fellow pet lovers, and with summer comes lots of outdoor fun with our pets. However, depending on where you live, the summer heat can present many dangers to your pet. Pet owners can sometimes be oblivious to these dangers, which can result in many health risks for our furry friends. Keep your pet comfortable and safe this summer with these tips on how to beat the heat.

What NOT to do

With temperatures rising to potentially dangerous levels in the summer months, you have to be conscious of your pet’s safety. In the hot summer months, these are some of the ‘DONTS’ to keep in mind when caring for your pet in the heat.

  • Never leave your pet unattended inside of the car. Honestly, it is never a good idea to leave your pet unattended in a vehicle for any length of time beyond a couple of minutes, but this is especially true in the event of extreme temperatures, whether hot or cold. The inside of a car on just a warm day can reach dangerous and fatal temperature levels, and it can happen within minutes! Print out this Humane Society flyer to disperse and help to educate your community.
  • Do not put a muzzle on a dog while they are out in the heat. There is a reason why dogs start panting when they get really hot – it is a natural way of controlling their body temperature. When you put a muzzle on a dog while they are out in the heat, you are preventing this natural process from occurring, which can lead to over-heating or heat stroke.
  • Do not leave your pet outside for extended periods of time during extreme heat. If it is too hot for you to be outside for an extended period of time, then you should consider it too hot for your pet as well.

Warning Signs of Heat Stroke

It is important to be aware of the signs that your pet may be in danger of a heat stroke. Some of these warning signs are:

  • Heavy panting
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Excessive thirst
  • Lethargy
  • Glazed eyes
  • Lack of coordination
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Dizziness
  • Profuse salivation
  • Vomiting

Pets who are most susceptible to suffering from heat stroke are usually very old or very young, overweight, or pets not conditioned to prolonged exercise. Speaking of exercise, if you are out exercising with your pet and they suddenly insist on slowing down or laying down – this is a sign that your pet is over-heated or over-exerted. Listen to what your pet is trying to tell you. Here are some more helpful tips on recognizing the warning signs of a heat stroke.

If you suspect that your pet is suffering from a heat stroke, move them to the shade or an air-conditioned area immediately, place ice packs or cold towels to their head, neck and chest and take them to the veterinarian as soon as possible.

Tips to Consider

  • If your pet is going to be outside in the heat for any extended amount of time, be sure that they have access to plenty of water.
  • Do not assume that a dog house is a proper place for your pet to cool off in the heat. Dog houses are built to prevent air movement and can build up heat quickly.
  • When taking your pet out to exercise or walk/jog, be aware that the hot asphalt/concrete can be damaging to your pet’s paws. You’ve walked barefoot on hot asphalt before, right?
  • The best way to cool down your pet is by placing cool water or cloths on their neck, pads of feet, or belly.
  • If you have a longer haired dog, consider getting their hair cut shorter in the summer months.

Now that you know how to keep your pet comfortable and safe in the hot, summer months – get outside and have some fun with your pet on those beautiful, sunny days. Just don’t overdo it and stay cool!

Eagle Pack Nutrition in Action Video

July 14th, 2015

Check out our new Eagle Pack- Nutrition in Action video!

How Will You Celebrate Pet Appreciation Week?

June 3rd, 2015

In the immortal words of a 15 year old, “Appreciate your pets. Because they love you and they’re always there for you.” Sounds like sound advice.

Of course, we’re there for them too. For walks and snuggles and even the not-fun stuff like vet visits.

The Humane Society started Pet Appreciation Week to bring attention to shelter pets and help them find their furrever homes. To celebrate, you can take a little extra time with your pets this week to be grateful for them.

Think of all the things your pet does that makes you smile. Maybe it’s effusive tail wagging when you open your eyes in the morning or sitting on your computer and interrupting your Facebook time later in the day.

5 Ways You Can Celebrate Pet Appreciation Week

  • You know that place your dog loves? Maybe it’s hiking in a State Park or swimming in a local creek. Take him there. Summer’s here and it’s a perfect time to seize the moment.
  • Give all of them good brushing. ‘Tis the season for shedding and there’s no better way to grab that excess before it ends up on your floors and in your furniture and all over your clothes than with a good brushing.
  • Clean out your closets and donate your threadbare towels and linens to a local shelter. They can use them to line pet crates and clean up messes. They’re happy to accept your financial donations too.
  • Give a pet massage. Both cats and dogs can enjoy a little massage. Wait until they’re in a relaxed state and start giving gentle strokes with one hand and then both. Add slight pressure around muscles and see how your pet reacts. If they look relaxed and happy, continue.
  • “Share” pictures of shelter animals looking for their homes on social media. You can go to the shelter yourself and snap a few pictures or look for the ones already circulating the social media sites. The more people who see them, the more likely you’ll help them find their forever homes.

Did you adopt your pet from a shelter? If so, why not send a thank you note with a picture to the shelter? You can even post it on their social media pages. Not only does it make the staff and volunteers feel good, but you might be helping someone else choose their next pet.

You can also volunteer. If your local shelter is holding an event, they may need someone to help distribute collars and leashes or otherwise help guide visitors. All you need to do is ask.

What will you do this Pet Appreciation Week?

Eagle Pack Pet Food- Nutrition in Action

June 3rd, 2015

Click the image below to view the Eagle Pack video:

How to Make a Disaster Plan for Your Pets

May 21st, 2015

It is extremely important for pet owners to have a plan in place in the event of a disaster or evacuation. With pets being a special part of the family, it’s important for them to be included in the family’s evacuation plans. We’d like to bring awareness to the importance of planning ahead to ensure that your pets are taken care of if a disaster were to occur.

Plan Ahead for Taking Shelter

In the event of a disaster, it is important to have a designated place for you and your pets to take shelter. This will prevent unnecessary stress and confusion during an emergency situation. Here are some things to consider when choosing a shelter.

  • Not all storm shelters will allow pets, so it is important to contact local disaster shelters to find out ahead of time
  • Contact your veterinarian for information regarding pet friendly safe havens
  • Local animal shelters may provide emergency shelter and/or have a foster plan for temporary placement in a home outside the area
  • Make a list of hotels outside of your area that allow pets – this could be a safe option for you and your pets to take shelter together
  • Be aware of road closures and all possible routes to get to your chosen shelter locations

Keep Your Pets Prepared

It is just as important for your pets to be prepared for a disaster as the rest of your family.

  • Have an updated emergency kit for your pet. The Red Cross has designed a Disaster Safety Checklist for your pets
  • Be sure that your pet is current on vaccinations and has been micro-chipped. In the event that your pet is lost during a disaster, having them micro-chipped can be their ticket home.
  • If your pet has to be placed in an animal shelter during a disaster, you want to be sure they are vaccinated and protected from the spread of disease. Be sure that your pet is current on vaccinations and has been micro-chipped. In the event that your pet is lost during a disaster, having them micro-chipped can be their ticket home.
  • If your pet has to be placed in an animal shelter during a disaster, you want to be sure they are vaccinated and protected from the spread of disease
  • Be sure that you have proper pet carriers to transport your pets during a disaster. If you have a pet that suffers from anxiety of any kind, whether storm or separation, talk to your veterinarian about possible medications that may help during disaster situations.
  • It may help to have an old shirt, or any item that has your scent, to keep inside your pet’s carrier – this has been shown to provide comfort to pets in a stressful situation
  • Get a Rescue Alert Sticker to place on the outside of your home to alert rescue groups that there are animals inside your home.

Designate a Caregiver for Your Pet

This is something that deserves careful thought and consideration. There are two types of caregivers that need to be designated for any given disaster situation.

  • Temporary Caregiver: This is someone who you will choose to provide temporary care during a disaster situation. A neighbor or someone who lives close by would be a good choice as well as someone who is often at home during the day when you are gone to work. This person should have access to your house and should be a familiar face to your pet. Be sure that your temporary caregiver is aware of your Disaster Plan and your chosen safe haven for your pet
  • Permanent Caregiver: This is the person that you designate to take care of your pet in the event that you can no longer care for them. Consider choosing someone who has either cared for your pet in the past or has experience caring for animals. Once you choose someone who is willing to take on this responsibility, discuss your expectations and be sure that your permanent caregiver fully understands how to properly take care of your beloved pet.

Prepare for Evacuation

In the event of an evacuation, it is best to always be prepared for the worst case scenario – in other words, assume that you will not be able to return for at least a month.

  • If you have a close friend or family member that lives in a nearby or reasonably located city, you may want to designate them as a potential temporary caregiver for your pet in the event of evacuation
  • Have an emergency kit with all of your pets basic needs located in your house near an exit for convenient access
  • Bring your pet inside immediately if extreme weather is predicted – pets are likely to wander during bad weather if kept outside

When disaster strikes, having a proper Disaster Plan will give you peace of mind to know that your pets will be properly taken care of – because after all, our pets are our family.


Responsible Pet Owners Month

February 24th, 2015

Owning a pet is a rewarding part of life, but there are certain responsibilities that are a big part of the package deal and your pet relies on you in many ways. February is Responsible Pet Owners Month and in recognition, we’ve compiled a list of things that you can do as a responsible pet owner.

5 Responsibilities of a Pet Owner


1. Do Your Research – Being a responsible pet owner begins before even bringing a pet into your home. It is your responsibility to do the research involved to decide on a pet that will fit into your lifestyle.

  • Consider your current daily schedule and how much time you’ll be able to designate for your pet’s needs.
  • Do your research on breed-specific characteristics and the activity levels that various breeds of dogs require to ensure it is a good match for your lifestyle.

2. Practice Healthy Habits- Whether it’s long walks and hikes or active play in the house or yard, encouraging regular exercise will help keep your pet (and you) healthy

  • Fun Fact – The New York Times has stated that before getting a dog, new dog owners had timed about 89 minutes of weekly walking, but dog ownership boosted that number to 130 minutes a week.

3. Have Your Pet Micro-Chipped – You never know when your pet may be feeling adventurous and dig their way out of the fence, or a door may get left open and serve as an invitation for them to sneak out. Having your pet micro-chipped can be a life-saver when it comes to finding a lost pet.

  • The micro-chip serves as your pet’s personal tracking device, allowing you to locate them if they get lost.
  • This is also a service that is usually included when adopting a pet from an animal shelter.

4. Schedule Health Check-ups – Maintaining your pet’s health is one of the biggest responsibilities of a pet owner, and a big part of that is scheduling a yearly veterinary exam.

  • Our pets are unable to tell us when something is wrong, so it is up to us as their owner to identify any potential problems and to know when they need medical attention.
  • Yearly veterinary exams are also necessary to renew any medications your pet may need, including preventative heart worm medication and/or flea and tick prevention.

5. Provide a Nutritional Diet – As the saying goes, “You are what you eat.” Well, the same goes for your pet. Be selective when it comes to choosing your pet’s food to be sure they receive proper nutrition.

  • Feeding a diet with high quality, wholesome ingredients will help ensure your pet gets the most out of the nutrition they receive.
  • Eagle Pack has a variety of diets suitable for pet’s life stage and lifestyle. From small breed to large and giant breed dogs, ranging from puppy to adulthood, Eagle Pack provides formulas with the right balance of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates combined with health promoting antioxidant support.

Caring for a pet is a daily responsibility, but the responsibility comes with a reward. A reward of unconditional love and daily gratitude from your #1 fan – your pet.

Eagle Pack Valentine’s Donation

February 13th, 2015

In honor of Valentine’s Day, Eagle Pack Pet Food recently donated close to $9,000 worth of natural pet food to our friends at Heartland Small Animal Rescue in South Bend, Indiana. That’s 4,320 pounds! Check out the pictures of these happy dogs:

Happy Valentine’s Day from Eagle Pack.