Archive For the ‘Pet Safety’ Category

How You Can Help Your Local Animal Shelter During the Holidays

Monday, December 15th, 2014

3,500 animal shelters across the country provide care for lost or unwanted dogs and cats year round. The holidays are a perfect time to recognize your local animal shelter for their hard work.

Here’s how you can help this holiday season:

1-Donate Your Time – Whether you can volunteer to walk dogs, staff a table at a special event or clean out cages, there are lots of opportunities to help. Most shelters have a volunteer coordinator who matches your interests with their needs. Just give them a call and they’ll put you with the right person.

2—Donate Goods—Pet food, toys, crates, old linens, even paper towels and other cleaning supplies are needed. Those toys that Fluffy never looks at? Those towels with a frayed edge? Pack ‘em up and deliver them to your local animal shelter. Toys can find a new life with different animals and the towels or old blankets can give them something soft to lie on.

3-The Gift of Money –According to The Humane Society, a gift of $100 will vaccinate, feed and house a shelter pet for a week. Any donation amount can help cover costs of medicine, procedures, and other needs.

Check your animal shelter’s website for donation instructions. They may be collecting for a specific animal or simply have a general fund. If you want to give the gift that keeps on giving, you can sign up to give a monthly donation.

4—Foster pets—If you have the time and space to foster a dog for even a few weeks, you can free up valuable space at the animal shelter so they can house another pet. Of course, fostering a dog is a big commitment so make sure you’re up for the task.

5—Spread the word – Post furry adoptees on your Facebook page. Partner with a school or community organization to host a pet food drive. There are many ways you can help spread the word and find loving homes for some pets.

This Past, Present, and Future of Mushing

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014

Mushers Past and Present

Hike! The driver yells and the dogs start racing toward their next goal.  They navigate through the snow and ice of the Alaskan wilderness via training and verbal commands from the “musher” on the sled they pull.

The Iditarod, an annual race for dog sled teams and the people who drive them, covers 1000 miles across the Alaskan wilderness. It spans two weeks and draws competitors from all over the world. Started in 1973 to commemorate the history of dog sledding, it’s grown into the world’s most competitive race.

Work and Transportation

“Mushing”, the practice of using hardy, cold-weather dogs to pull sleds, dates to at least 2000 BC. People have used mushing for centuries to move everything from mail to refrigerators through snowy terrain. They were even used as ambulances in cold climates like Norway during World War I.

Heroic Mushing Teams

One famous run occurred in 1925, when 20 mushers and 150 sled dogs relayed a serum across Alaska in five and a half days in order to save the residents of Nome and surrounding areas from an epidemic.

The Future of Mushing

Today, most deliveries are made by plane and mushing is primarily a sport. It’s growing in popularity with dog lovers the world over. You don’t even need to live in a snowy environment.

“Carting” is growing in popularity as a fun sport to do with your dog. Like it sounds, “carting” uses a cart (usually with wheels) and the dogs. Almost anyone can participate in this activity.

Sled or cart pulling isn’t relegated to only Alaskan breeds either. Traditionally, Malamutes and huskies have been sled dogs, but all types of breeds, including Dalmatians and Golden Retrievers have been hooked up to a sled and taught the techniques. If you have an active dog, chances are, they’d enjoy the activity.

Dog lovers can participate in many types of races. In some, you only need one dog. For others, multiple dogs work better. Would your dog enjoy pulling a sled or a cart?

Eagle Pack Donates to Indiana-Area Adoption Center

Tuesday, August 5th, 2014

Eagle Pack recently donated over 74,000 lbs of natural pet food! The donation was able to help shelters that were in need of food in over 3 states.

“There are no words that could express the gratitude of the rescues and shelters that received this food. We used Facebook to reach rescues in 3 different states who needed help, along with contacts we had at the shelter. We were also aware of the need to help private citizens as our shelter provides food to anyone in need. Too often we have people call wanting to surrender their pets because they cannot afford to feed them.

We were able to give 24 rescues and 8 shelters food. We also gave 8 pallets to the Northwest Indiana Food Bank.  They provide food to churches in Lake and Porter County to families in need. Thanks to this donation, Eagle Pack will be available to families that have pets. No one should ever have to give up a pet family member because of lack of food.

Again a huge thank you and two paws up you and everyone at WellPet for helping those that can’t help themselves.”- Donnajean Doyle of Lake County Sheriff’s Animal Adoption and Control

How to Keep Your Pet Safe in the Heat

Tuesday, July 29th, 2014
As the first day of summer arrives with the accompanying soaring temperatures, it’s important to think about your pet’s safety in the heat. The dog days of summer are no less dangerous to your pet than the depths of winter. Here’s how to keep them safe.
1. Don’t leave your pets in parked cars. It only takes 10 minutes for the temperature inside a car to rise to 102 on an 85 degree day. Would you want to sit in a parked car with the windows cracked when it was 102 inside? Imagine how your pet feels wearing a fur coat.
Extreme heat can damage your pet’s organs and quickly cause heat stroke or death. No matter how much your pet likes to ride, for his own safety, leave him at home when you go out.
2. Be sensitive to the heat when exercising and keep mid-day walks short. When you’re out, watch your pet for signs of overheating such as extreme panting and take breaks when you need it. You’ll both enjoy longer walks more in the early part of the day or evening.
3. While the warm weather may find you outside more than in the cold months, this means there may be more opportunity for your pet to get into fertilizer, mulch or compost piles. Be aware of your pet’s whereabouts when you’re outside and keep away from these potential problems.
4. Plenty of cool water and shade – It seems obvious but if your dog is going to be outside during a hot spell, they should hang out under a tree or other shady location and have plenty of cool water to drink.
5. If you don’t have cool air conditioned environment during a heat wave, try a kiddie wading pool. Water loving dogs will take to the wading pool with the enthusiasm of a toddler. In fact, you may find your dog loves the wading pool so much; it’s his new favorite pastime.
6. Know the signs of heatstroke — The American Red Cross says if you suspect heatstroke, take your dog’s temperature. If it’s above 104 degrees, you’ll want to spray with cool water immediately and then retake her temperature. Your goal is to get the temperature below 103 within 15 minutes. You can use soaked towels to wrap her and help cool her down. You’ll still need to take her in to the vet to test for shock. Heatstroke can cause heart and kidney problems.
Have fun with your pet this summer. Just use some caution and avert potential disasters before they happen with a little common sense.

It’s important to think about your pet’s safety in the heat, because the dog days of summer are no less dangerous to your pet than the depths of winter. Here’s how to keep them safe.

1. Don’t leave your pets in parked cars. It only takes 10 minutes for the temperature inside a car to rise to 102 degrees on an 85 degree day. Would you want to sit in a parked car with the windows cracked when it was 102 inside? Imagine how your pet feels wearing a fur coat.

Extreme heat can damage your pet’s organs and quickly cause heat stroke or death. No matter how much your pet likes to ride, for his own safety, leave him at home when you go out in the heat.

2. Be sensitive to the heat when exercising and keep mid-day walks short. When you’re out, watch your pet for signs of overheating such as extreme panting, and take breaks when you need it. You’ll both enjoy longer walks more in the early part of the day or later in the evening.

3. When you’re in the yard with your dog, keep a close eye on him to ensure he doesn’t get  into fertilizer, mulch or compost. If consumed, each of these materials may be very harmful for your pup. Be sure to wait the recommended amount of time before letting your dog out on a chemical-treated lawn, and be sure to store any excess lawn treatment materials out of reach of your pet.

4. Plenty of cool water and shade – It seems obvious but if your dog is going to be outside during a hot spell, make sure he or she  is able to take shelter under a tree or other shady location, and make sure to keep plenty of cool, fresh water close-by.

5. If you don’t have  a cool air conditioned environment during a heat wave, offer your dog a kiddie wading pool. Water-loving dogs will take to the wading pool with the enthusiasm of a toddler. In fact, you may find your dog loves the wading pool so much, he won’t want to get out!

6. Know the signs of heatstroke — The American Red Cross says if you suspect heatstroke, take your dog’s temperature. If it’s above 104 degrees, you’ll want to spray her with cool water immediately and then retake her temperature. Your goal is to get your dog’s temperature below 103 within 15 minutes. Another technique to cool your dog down is to wrap the dog in cold, wet towels. In this situation, get your dog to the vet as soon as you’re able. Heatstroke can cause heart and kidney problems, so your vet will need to do a complete evaluation on your pet.

Winter Tips

Thursday, December 12th, 2013
Now that the coats and gloves are out of their summer hibernation you may need to give some extra thought to your pets in cold weather. Animals with diabetes and other health issues can be particularly susceptible to the change in weather.
1—Coats– While a St. Bernard will be thrilled with the drop in temperature, your
Pointer may be shivering. Shorthaired dogs simply don’t have the same advantage. You can keep your pet warm with a coat, blanket or vest. A waterproof one will keep them warm and dry on those wet, dreary days. Shorthaired dogs will also be happiest with shorter walks when it’s really cold outside.
2—Give ‘em shelter – While many dogs will be prefer to be inside during the winter, the cold weather breeds (and some cats) will want to enjoy the snow more than you. If your pets will be outside for extended periods, provide them with a dog house or a crate on the porch. Add a blanket or towel for comfort and warmth. Of course, check on them often and don’t leave them outside in freezing weather when you’ll be away for hours. Pets can develop frostbite and hypothermia if they get too cold.
3—Protect them from ice/snow melters – The chemicals used to melt snow and ice in driveways and on sidewalks are good for preventing slips, but they can be harmful to your pets. Be sure to rinse or wipe your pet’s paws after a walk. Otherwise, they’ll lick the chemicals off, causing  inflammation and upset tummies.
One way to clean them when you come in from a walk is to use a rimmed cookie sheet by the door. Fill it with warm water and have them step in it, or place their paws in one at a time. This will loosen any ice crystals that may have gotten lodged in their paws and warm their feet up. Wipe them with a towel afterwards.
4—Lock up Antifreeze – Antifreeze tastes sweet to dogs and cats but it can be deadly. Keep antifreeze locked up and far out of the reach of curious pets.
5—Play inside – When the “wintry mix” is into its 3rd day, or your pet isn’t one who enjoys the cold, warm up inside. A rollicking game of “hide and seek” will warm you both up. Just make sure you take a few minutes to move delicate furniture or breakables out of the way.

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Now that the coats and gloves are out of their summer hibernation you may need to give some extra thought to your pets in cold weather. Animals with diabetes and other health issues can be particularly susceptible to the change in weather.

1) Coats– While a St. Bernard will be thrilled with the drop in temperature, your

Pointer may be shivering. Shorthaired dogs simply don’t have the same advantage. You can keep your pet warm with a coat, blanket or vest. A waterproof one will keep them warm and dry on those wet, dreary days. Shorthaired dogs will also be happiest with shorter walks when it’s really cold outside.

2) Give ‘em shelter – While many dogs will be prefer to be inside during the winter, the cold weather breeds (and some cats) will want to enjoy the snow more than you. If your pets will be outside for extended periods, provide them with a dog house or a crate on the porch. Add a blanket or towel for comfort and warmth. Of course, check on them often and don’t leave them outside in freezing weather when you’ll be away for hours. Pets can develop frostbite and hypothermia if they get too cold.

3) Protect them from ice/snow melters – The chemicals used to melt snow and ice in driveways and on sidewalks are good for preventing slips, but they can be harmful to your pets. Be sure to rinse or wipe your pet’s paws after a walk. Otherwise, they’ll lick the chemicals off, causing  inflammation and upset tummies.

One way to clean them when you come in from a walk is to use a rimmed cookie sheet by the door. Fill it with warm water and have them step in it, or place their paws in one at a time. This will loosen any ice crystals that may have gotten lodged in their paws and warm their feet up. Wipe them with a towel afterwards.

4) Lock up Antifreeze – Antifreeze tastes sweet to dogs and cats but it can be deadly. Keep antifreeze locked up and far out of the reach of curious pets.

5) Play inside – When the “wintry mix” is into its 3rd day, or your pet isn’t one who enjoys the cold, warm up inside. A rollicking game of “hide and seek” will warm you both up. Just make sure you take a few minutes to move delicate furniture or breakables out of the way.

5 Summer Safety Tips for Dogs

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

With the arrival of June, summertime fun is in the air. Whether you’re headed to the beach or a backyard BBQ, be sure to take extra precaution with your pets to keep them safe. Pack a water bowl, some snacks, a towel and have fun!

Safety Tips for Dogs:

  • Stay hydrated — If you’re going to be outside with your pet this summer, make sure Fido has plenty of clean, cool water. Dogs can get overheated if they’re playing or running hard and they need to drink plenty of water.
  • Keep food and drink out of reach – Nothing puts an end to a picnic faster than realizing Max ate all the hamburgers and hot dogs. Plus, the ensuing stomach upset will not be pretty.
  • Lock down – holiday celebrations bring fireworks and dogs don’t like them. The booms and explosions hurt their ears and frighten them. Make sure you have a crate for your pet, or keep them on a short leash or better yet, get them home before the fireworks begin.
  • Dog bug repellant – if your dog attracts mosquitos, ease the itch with a bug repellant such as pennyroyal or citronella rubbed into a bandanna and tied around your pet’s neck. Pests don’t like these scents and are likely to seek dinner elsewhere.
  • No alcohol – Alcohol can be fatal to dogs so don’t let them get into the beer or other alcohol.

With a little planning, you can have a fantastic summer with your pet and keep everyone safe.   Share your plans on our Facebook Page.

Summertime Safety for Pets

Thursday, June 28th, 2012
Staying Cool

Staying Cool

The dog days of summer are upon us, and that means longer days and lots of gatherings and  outdoor fun. This also may mean changes in your dog or cat’s regular routine. To help your pets enjoy the rest of summer’s festivities right alongside of you, see below for some common summertime activities that could pose a potential risk to your pet, and tips for how to manage them.

Top 10 Watch-outs & Safety Tips for Pets

1. Grilling. While adults may congregate around the grill master, the heat of the grill, raw meats, and sharp utensils can pose a risk to children and pets, and charcoal briquettes can be appealing toys or snacks. Keep that area free of smaller party guests at all times.

2. Fire. An open flame from a fire pit (or grill) can spark or create embers, which can cause your pet’s fur to catch fire, or cause a painful paw burn if your pet steps on it. Keep your beloved pet(s) away from any open flames.

3. Table Food. Corn-on-the-cob can pose a choking risk, fatty meats can cause stomach upset, some meats have bones that easily splinter, and chocolate is always a no-no for pets. Be sure your pet cannot access the food table, and warn guests to not feed table scraps either. Keep some Holistix natural dog biscuits nearby for a healthy snack!

4. Open Doors. With people going in and out, cats and dogs might escape to an unsafe environment, or even get injured if caught in a closing door. Post signs at the doors to warn guests to watch for pets upon entering or exiting.

5. Swimming. While cats typically steer clear of the water, many of our canine friends love a refreshing swim. Put a life jacket on your dog if in a boat or any water above shoulder height, and avoid letting your pup swim with large groups to prevent an accidental underwater dunking.

6. Plants. Did you know that many common household plants, including tulips, azaleas, ivy, oleander, lilies and the yew plant are all poisonous to pets? Some symptoms can include diarrhea, vomiting, kidney or heart problems, or worse. Keep these plants quarantined, and contact your vet if you think your pet ingested any plants.

7. Fleas & Ticks. These summer pests can make your pet – and your household – very itchy. Even worse, they feed off your pet’s blood, and may cause Anemia, Lyme disease or Erhlichia, which can cause arthritis or kidney failure. Apply topical flea & tick medicine in your pet’s recommended dose, and continue to apply through late fall.

8. Exercise. Take your dog outside early in the day when it is cooler so he or she can release some energy and avoid over-stimulation from a patio full of guests. Is your dog or cat a less social pet? Keep him or her in a cool, quiet area, with some background noise like (e.g., an A/C or TV) to distract.

9. Open Car Windows. Like us, our pets love fresh air. While summertime may conjure images of dogs hanging their heads out the window, with tongues wagging, this can actually pose multiple dangers. Smaller pets may jump or fall out the window, or road debris may catch an unsuspecting dog in the eye. This can cause irreparable damage at any speeds, so keep your pets safely inside the car.

10. Heat. In the dog days of summer, a fur coat can cause your pet’s body temperature to increase to unsafe levels, and a hot pavement can burn sensitive paws. If outside, be sure your pet has access to ample shade and plenty of cool water. Sprinklers and hoses are a fun way to cool off the whole family.

Have any additional watch outs of your own? Share your summertime pet safety tips or stories with other pet parents at www.facebook.com/eaglepackpetfood.