Archive For the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Eagle Pack Valentine’s Donation

Friday, February 13th, 2015

In honor of Valentine’s Day, Eagle Pack Pet Food recently donated close to $9,000 worth of natural pet food to our friends at Heartland Small Animal Rescue in South Bend, Indiana. That’s 4,320 pounds! Check out the pictures of these happy dogs:

Happy Valentine’s Day from Eagle Pack.

How You Can Help Your Local Animal Shelter During the Holidays

Monday, December 15th, 2014

3,500 animal shelters across the country provide care for lost or unwanted dogs and cats year round. The holidays are a perfect time to recognize your local animal shelter for their hard work.

Here’s how you can help this holiday season:

1-Donate Your Time – Whether you can volunteer to walk dogs, staff a table at a special event or clean out cages, there are lots of opportunities to help. Most shelters have a volunteer coordinator who matches your interests with their needs. Just give them a call and they’ll put you with the right person.

2—Donate Goods—Pet food, toys, crates, old linens, even paper towels and other cleaning supplies are needed. Those toys that Fluffy never looks at? Those towels with a frayed edge? Pack ‘em up and deliver them to your local animal shelter. Toys can find a new life with different animals and the towels or old blankets can give them something soft to lie on.

3-The Gift of Money –According to The Humane Society, a gift of $100 will vaccinate, feed and house a shelter pet for a week. Any donation amount can help cover costs of medicine, procedures, and other needs.

Check your animal shelter’s website for donation instructions. They may be collecting for a specific animal or simply have a general fund. If you want to give the gift that keeps on giving, you can sign up to give a monthly donation.

4—Foster pets—If you have the time and space to foster a dog for even a few weeks, you can free up valuable space at the animal shelter so they can house another pet. Of course, fostering a dog is a big commitment so make sure you’re up for the task.

5—Spread the word – Post furry adoptees on your Facebook page. Partner with a school or community organization to host a pet food drive. There are many ways you can help spread the word and find loving homes for some pets.

How to Keep Your Pet Safe in the Heat

Tuesday, July 29th, 2014
As the first day of summer arrives with the accompanying soaring temperatures, it’s important to think about your pet’s safety in the heat. The dog days of summer are no less dangerous to your pet than the depths of winter. Here’s how to keep them safe.
1. Don’t leave your pets in parked cars. It only takes 10 minutes for the temperature inside a car to rise to 102 on an 85 degree day. Would you want to sit in a parked car with the windows cracked when it was 102 inside? Imagine how your pet feels wearing a fur coat.
Extreme heat can damage your pet’s organs and quickly cause heat stroke or death. No matter how much your pet likes to ride, for his own safety, leave him at home when you go out.
2. Be sensitive to the heat when exercising and keep mid-day walks short. When you’re out, watch your pet for signs of overheating such as extreme panting and take breaks when you need it. You’ll both enjoy longer walks more in the early part of the day or evening.
3. While the warm weather may find you outside more than in the cold months, this means there may be more opportunity for your pet to get into fertilizer, mulch or compost piles. Be aware of your pet’s whereabouts when you’re outside and keep away from these potential problems.
4. Plenty of cool water and shade – It seems obvious but if your dog is going to be outside during a hot spell, they should hang out under a tree or other shady location and have plenty of cool water to drink.
5. If you don’t have cool air conditioned environment during a heat wave, try a kiddie wading pool. Water loving dogs will take to the wading pool with the enthusiasm of a toddler. In fact, you may find your dog loves the wading pool so much; it’s his new favorite pastime.
6. Know the signs of heatstroke — The American Red Cross says if you suspect heatstroke, take your dog’s temperature. If it’s above 104 degrees, you’ll want to spray with cool water immediately and then retake her temperature. Your goal is to get the temperature below 103 within 15 minutes. You can use soaked towels to wrap her and help cool her down. You’ll still need to take her in to the vet to test for shock. Heatstroke can cause heart and kidney problems.
Have fun with your pet this summer. Just use some caution and avert potential disasters before they happen with a little common sense.

It’s important to think about your pet’s safety in the heat, because the dog days of summer are no less dangerous to your pet than the depths of winter. Here’s how to keep them safe.

1. Don’t leave your pets in parked cars. It only takes 10 minutes for the temperature inside a car to rise to 102 degrees on an 85 degree day. Would you want to sit in a parked car with the windows cracked when it was 102 inside? Imagine how your pet feels wearing a fur coat.

Extreme heat can damage your pet’s organs and quickly cause heat stroke or death. No matter how much your pet likes to ride, for his own safety, leave him at home when you go out in the heat.

2. Be sensitive to the heat when exercising and keep mid-day walks short. When you’re out, watch your pet for signs of overheating such as extreme panting, and take breaks when you need it. You’ll both enjoy longer walks more in the early part of the day or later in the evening.

3. When you’re in the yard with your dog, keep a close eye on him to ensure he doesn’t get  into fertilizer, mulch or compost. If consumed, each of these materials may be very harmful for your pup. Be sure to wait the recommended amount of time before letting your dog out on a chemical-treated lawn, and be sure to store any excess lawn treatment materials out of reach of your pet.

4. Plenty of cool water and shade – It seems obvious but if your dog is going to be outside during a hot spell, make sure he or she  is able to take shelter under a tree or other shady location, and make sure to keep plenty of cool, fresh water close-by.

5. If you don’t have  a cool air conditioned environment during a heat wave, offer your dog a kiddie wading pool. Water-loving dogs will take to the wading pool with the enthusiasm of a toddler. In fact, you may find your dog loves the wading pool so much, he won’t want to get out!

6. Know the signs of heatstroke — The American Red Cross says if you suspect heatstroke, take your dog’s temperature. If it’s above 104 degrees, you’ll want to spray her with cool water immediately and then retake her temperature. Your goal is to get your dog’s temperature below 103 within 15 minutes. Another technique to cool your dog down is to wrap the dog in cold, wet towels. In this situation, get your dog to the vet as soon as you’re able. Heatstroke can cause heart and kidney problems, so your vet will need to do a complete evaluation on your pet.

Thursday, April 25th, 2013
This is a video of soon to be 14 year old Odie doing his morning laps around his pen waiting for Eagle Pack breakfast. With him are 11 year old Ch. NorthWapiti’s Dasher and Odie’s littermate brother, Ch. NorthWapiti’s Loki. All have finished multiple Iditarods – and all have been fed Eagle Pack almost since birth!

Featured Story – Meet Hank

Thursday, January 5th, 2012

hankHank’s entry into the world was rough (he was one of only two pups to survive the birth), and his first couple weeks were touch and go. Despite a rocky start, he seemed to be doing very well, so we thought it was best not to alter his diet at all. His breeder told us he was eating Eagle Pack Puppy Formula Dry Dog Food – that it was the only food he used or recommended. Hank has gone from 15 to 50 lbs in three short months, and he is strong and healthy. Thanks Eagle Pack!

Nikki D., Temperance MI

Large and Giant Breed Puppy Health

Friday, November 18th, 2011
Large Breed Puppies Need Special Nutrition for Controlled Growth

Large Breed Puppies Need Special Nutrition for Controlled Growth

Large or giant breed dogs are among the most popular breeds. Of the 160 or so breeds registered with the American Kennel Club, the majority listed in the top half are large or giant breeds. Labrador Retrievers are the most popular breed by a significant margin, and have been for some time. Golden Retrievers, German Shepherds, Boxers and Standard Poodles are all among the top ten breeds.

It is essential that pet parents are aware of the special needs of large and giant breed puppies. Getting off to the right start is essential in order to assure a happy and healthy life for these special pets.

Many of the larger breeds have the potential to grow 100 times their birth weight. They have a faster growth rate; however, that rate must be controlled in order to allow the puppy to develop normally, without the risk of problems. For this reason, it is important to feed a diet that specifically addresses the needs of large and giant breed puppies. Like any diet, the basic formula should be extremely nutritious, containing highly digestible ingredients that address all the needs of that specific life stage.

Just what are the nutritional needs of these rapidly growing large and giant breed puppies?

Controlled growth, optimum levels of calcium and phosphorus, essential fatty acids as well as specific natural ingredients to enhance development are all essential elements in an optimum natural formula for a large or giant breed puppy.

If growth is not controlled and calcium levels are in excess, the puppy can have an increased risk of contracting one of several developmental bone diseases, all of which are very painful and can have permanent detrimental effects on the puppy’s quality of life. Traditional puppy diets are designed with lots of protein and fat so as to provide large amounts of calories. Large and giant breed puppies do not do well on these diets and for that reason, specific large and giant breed formulas were developed.

Like all of the Eagle Pack formulas, the large and giant breed puppy recipe provides high quality, natural nutrients and supplements have particular importance when considering a specific diet for puppies, especially those large and giant breed puppies.

1. Controlled Growth:

If too many calories are consumed, the rate of growth will be increased. This is to be avoided. Too many calories increases weight too rapidly on the developing bones and can increase the stress on developing bones and raise the risk of encouraging developmental bone problems. These puppies should be fed an amount of food that maintains a slightly lean body condition, at least until they are approximately 10-12 months of age.

For this reason, the Eagle Pack Large and Giant Breed Puppy recipe contains fewer calories than the traditional puppy recipes in order to help the pet parent maintain an ideal, slightly lean body mass while developing.

2. Provide Optimum Calcium and Phosphorus Levels for Large and Giant Breed Puppies:

Most would assume that large and giant breed puppies would need more calcium and phosphorus than a smaller breed puppy, as their bone structure is so much bigger. On the contrary, they actually need slightly less calcium. Too much calcium can also increase the incidence of any one of those very painful developmental bone diseases. The challenge is to provide just enough calcium to reduce the risk of bone problems while supplying levels that allow for maximum growth potential. As long as you are feeding a balanced diet, never supplement a large and giant breed puppy with a mineral supplement.

3. Guarantee Certain Essential Fatty Acids:

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an essential Omega-3 fatty acid that has been found to enhance brain development in puppies. It is important that these giant, and in some cases large breeds, are well trained so that control is maintained. By providing natural, functional food ingredients that support proper brain development, puppies have been found to be more easily trained in the basic obedience commands.

4. Probiotics or Direct Fed Microbials (DFMs) and Prebiotics:

Probiotics are the essential “good bacteria” that play a key role in establishing the normal flora of the gut so that proper digestion is achieved. They have the natural benefit of also enhancing the immune system early on in the puppy’s life. By feeding a daily diet that contains these natural organisms, the digestive system and immune system will be at optimum efficiency all the time.

Prebiotics are the essential foods necessary to keep the probiotics or DFMs healthy and happy. They are natural ingredients that have benefit specifically to the good bacteria, as well as additional advantages for the puppy.

It’s always best to feed regularly as opposed to leaving food out for your puppy at all times. This will help control rate of growth. Likewise, try and avoid feeding just before and just after exercise to reduce the chances of “bloat”, another potential problem for some breeds. Giving a puppy the right start in life is as important as giving a child the right start. Creating good habits that include regular exercise and feeding an optimum diet that will encourage maximum growth potential while reducing the risk of disease is the ultimate goal.

We encourage you to explore the entire Eagle Pack website and learn all you can with regard to our philosophy, the specific ingredients in our foods and much much more about the benefits of a holistic and natural pet food.

We have been making natural diets specifically for large and giant breed puppies for almost 25 years and have the experience and expertise to provide your pet with the ideal formula it deserves.

Eagle Pack® Named the Official Dog Food of the 2011 Iditarod® Trail Sled Dog Race

Wednesday, November 10th, 2010

001BA AA0239D001The Iditarod National Historic Trail runs along more than 1,049 miles of the roughest, most beautiful terrain Mother Nature has to offer.  “The Last Great Race on Earth”® pits man and animal against nature, and against wild Alaska at her best. It exemplifies the stamina and drive these canine athletes must have, and demonstrates the Nutrition in Action™ that Eagle Pack delivers. As the Official Dog Food Sponsor, Eagle Pack will also supply the teams with food along the trail, and dedicate funds to the health and care of the Iditarod dogs.

The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race runs from Anchorage to Nome, Alaska over approximately 10 days. More than 45 teams with 12 to 16 dogs each take to the icy snow each year to compete. The Iditarod is regarded as a symbolic link to the early history of the state, when mushers and sled dog teams were the only means by which to carry mail and supplies, including medicine, to the inland communities.  This trail is connected to many traditions commemorating the legacy of dog mushing.

Iditarod LogoEagle Pack has long sponsored five Iditarod mushers and their teams: Martin Buser, Hans Gatt, Dee Dee Jonrowe, Aliy Zurkle and Karen Ramsted. For these mushers, the Iditarod is not just a dog sled race, but rather a venue in which unique men and woman from all walks of life compete to meet personal goals. From fishermen and miners to lawyers, doctors and artists, men and women from all over the world travel to Alaska to take part in this journey.

“The commitment to the care and health of our dogs is proven by the support Eagle Pack gives to each of us,” said Dee Dee Jonrowe, Iditarod musher. “They have a long and rich heritage of conducting research and development to create their high quality formulas for superior natural nutrition.”

The health and well-being of all the animals is a top priority as they travel the snowy course for more two weeks.  Dr. Al Townshend, Eagle Pack’s staff veterinarian and former recipient of the Iditarod’s Golden Stethoscope Award for ultimate canine care-giving, joins the mushers on the trail to help keep all the dogs in top shape. “Eagle Pack’s high quality, performance-proven formula has been developed with canine athletes and quality breeders. This has helped us make better foods for all dogs, not just those that require exceptional nutrition, and resulted in our gaining an advanced understanding of a dog’s true needs,” he says.

To learn more about these canine athletes, and the care and preparation involved, sign up to become an Iditarod Insider™. With your membership, you can follow the leader 001AV EI0001 001board and see real time locations of mushers via GPS to read how fast teams are traveling and how much distance is between teams, and view checkpoints along with current temperatures on the trail. Insiders will also be able to access on demand video of the race so you’ll never miss a moment of the action!  Click on Iditarod Insider to sign up and receive a bonus $10 Eagle Pack coupon when you join.

Iditarod® , The Last Great Race on Earth®  and Iditarod Insider™ are registered trademarks of Iditarod Trail Committee, Inc.

Big Baby Thor

Tuesday, June 22nd, 2010
Big Baby Thor relaxing on the coach with his pet parent (Mary)

Big Baby Thor relaxing on the coach with his pet parent (Mary)

 Mary N.  sent in this photo of her beautiful Great Dane, Thor (his nick name is Big Baby Thor). Mary recently joined our community on Facebook and she was excited to let us know she feeds her Great Dane Eagle Pack! She shared his story as a testament to benefits Eagle Pack Dog Food for large breed dogs.

Mary knows that proper nutrition is so important for large & giant breed dogs such as Great Danes, who need a specialized diet. We’re so happy to hear that Mary found Eagle Pack early and as you can see – Big Baby Thor is thriving on Eagle Pack.

For more info about Large & Giant Breed Health, visit our Large & Giant Breed Resource Guide.